Brian Wall

Brian Wall, published by Momentum in 2006, is a great retrospective on the artist’s 50-plus year career (a part of which was surveyed in an exhibition at Hacket/Mill in San Francisco last fall). The book includes extensive photography of Wall’s steel structures (as well as some drawings made by Wall in the 1990s and wooden Mondrian-like boxes constructed during the 1950s when he was in St Ives).

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Martin Puryear

Simply put, Martin Puryear is a high-quality art historical review of the artist’s 30-year career. This extensive catalog has a significant image collection and informative scholarly texts, is well designed, and is expertly printed by the Museum of Modern Art on the occasion of Puryear’s retrospective exhibition at MoMA in 2007. The artist’s expert treatment of wood, a trait noteworthy throughout his career, is here evident. The diversity of construction, tone, texture, structure, personality, surface, and overall effect he gives to the wood medium are astounding. Although some of Puryear’s works are likened to Minimalism or Post-Minimalism, the artist’s wide range of styles and forms are evidenced. Each sculpture in the book (as well as some early woodcuts by the artist) is distinct, new, and refreshing, and helps to make this book utterly entrancing.

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Daniel Canogar: Vortices

“The inexonerable, river-like forces of history have conspired to whirlpool into their own worst nightmare” says George Stolz in the catalogue Daniel Canogar: Vortices. This “nightmare,” the Great Pacific Garbage Vortex, is the subject of one of six installations by the Spanish artist for the exhibition “Vortices.” This exhibition was hosted by the Fundacion Canal, which is affiliated with Canal Isabel II, the company that manages the water supplies for Madrid.

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The Art of Invention: Sculpture by Daniel A. Henderson

First an inventor and entrepreneur, Daniel A. Henderson has in the last four years produced a portfolio of contemporary sculpture.  His multi-ton marble sculptures depict technological advances through the ages. In doing so, Henderson explores technology’s impact on humanity. Henderson says, “Invention, like sculpture, is an artistic endeavor. Although the two disciplines utilize different mediums of expression, both share the ability to affect our perception and how we interact.”

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Thomas Houseago: What Went Down

Thomas Houseago, whose works draw reference to Star Wars, cartoons, rock album covers and numerous art movements including Futurism, Modernism, Cubism, and Minimalism, as well as the Renaissance, has quickly become a recognizable figure in contemporary art. The book What Went Down accompanies Houseago’s first major solo exhibition in a UK public gallery, at Modern Art Oxford.

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Gloria Kisch: Fusion of Opposites

The first comprehensive survey of the artist, Gloria Kisch: Fusion of Opposites clearly chronicles Gloria Kisch’s works through four essays and images from her three major periods, divided by her time in Venice CA, SoHo, and the Hamptons. Titled from a review by late ARTnews critic Melinda Wortz, the publication highlights the opposite forces of primordial nature and urban life as present throughout the artist’s extensive career.

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