Cast in Bronze: French Sculpture from Renaissance to Revolution

With 535 pages, Cast in Bronze is not a standard exhibition catalogue. Created in conjunction with an exhibition that toured the Louvre, the Met, and the Getty in 2008–09, the book is the product of “an unprecedented in-depth study of French bronzes” and functions more like an encyclopedia than a catalogue. It is an exhaustive attempt to cull together the lesser-known work of French artists, which are frequently out-shown by bronzes from Italy and Northern Europe. The exhibition relied heavily on the Louvre’s collection, but also offered a chance to see works from private collections and other difficult-to-visit museums such as the Windsor Castle Royal Collection, Versailles, Fontainebleau, and the Dresden State Art Collection.

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Statuesque

Public Art Fund recently released a catalogue of its 2010 City Hall Park exhibition, “Statuesque” (now on view at the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas through August 21). The original show featured 10 works by six artists—Pawel Althamer, Huma Bhabha, Aaron Curry, Thomas Houseago, Matthew Monahan, and Rebecca Warren. PAF installs sculpture in many locations around New York City, but the City Hall Park exhibitions are considered among their “major initiatives with established artists.” (“Sol LeWitt: Structures, 1996–2006” is on view there through December 3.)

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Singing in the Dark

You can see the work of Giny Vos everywhere—if you happen to live in the Netherlands. A prolific public artist, Vos has produced 11 works since 2005. Her new book, Singing in the Dark, spans her 25-year career, focusing primarily on public artworks completed in the last decade. For anyone unfamiliar with Vos’s work, including myself, Singing in the Dark is a successful introduction because it leaves you wanting to see more.

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Natura Humana: Outdoor Installations

Though Bob Verschueren’s work may not be so familiar to American audiences, he has created outdoor installations across Canada and all over Europe for more than 30 years. Natura Humana, which was published on the occasion of his recent installations at the Centre d’arts et de nature (France) and Le Festival des 5 saisons (Belgium), offers the perfect introduction to this nature artist. The publication is short at 95 pages, but it is well-illustrated (documenting more than 30 installations) and features essays by John K. Grande (a contributing editor for Sculpture) and Vinciane Despret, a philosopher and psychologist.

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John McCracken

In conjunction with the first European—and most comprehensive—retrospective of John McCracken’s (1934–2011) work, the Castello di Rivoli Museum of Contemporary Art has produced a catalogue that chronicles not only his artworks but also his place in the art world. The exhibition (on view through June 19) inaugurates a new series of retrospectives showcasing “artists who, for various reasons, have chosen to follow an independent approach but who, like [McCracken] are making waves in international contemporary art.” Although McCracken is frequently compared to such artists as Carl Andre and Donald Judd, the catalogue emphasizes his presence outside of Minimalism. With 232 illustrations, three essays, two interviews, and excerpts from 29 other authors, John McCracken is an extensive text describing a 50-year career.
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