Ruth Hardinger: In the Studio

 

Ruth Hardinger Sculpture

Layers Rise #1, 2016, concrete, concrete, cardboard, graphite, plaster, marble dust, acrylic, Photos by Robert Lowell

Ruth Hardinger is a passionate environmental activist, and her art-making materials, processes, and forms stem from this. Her studio — about 900 square feet with high ceilings — is filled with different series she has made or is still making. Some will be in a solo show at the David & Schweitzer Contemporary, Bushwick from February 17 –March 12, 2017.  D&S will also exhibit Hardinger’s work at Volta, March 1-5, 2017. Heavy totem-like cement sculptures stand above medium-tall and smaller works; the walls, tables, and floor are covered with beautiful natural rocks and smaller cement and mixed media pieces. Stacks of graphite works on paper and graphite on flattened milk cartons lie in a large mound in one area.  Monumental framed graphite works weighing over 200 pounds each hang high on studio walls, and a giant graphite rubbing titled 72 of 74 commands the back wall. I estimate that the studio holds more than 40 large and small sculptures and more than 200 two-dimensional works. Hardinger has another studio upstate as well. Playwright Edward Albee III (3.12.1928 – 9.16.2016) owned seven of her works. Continue reading

The Missing Archive of Yuri Schwebler

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Installing “Magnetic North,” c 1970-71. Image Courtesy Rory Connell

Now that it is winter, and the east coast of the U.S. is likely bracing for another portmanteau of snow, we’ll take a moment to recall the time the Washington Monument was turned into a sundial.

Featured briefly on the CBS Evening News on Monday, February 11, 1974, sculptor Yuri Schwebler, visibly cold, stands by and somewhat awkwardly discuses his motivation to ray lines away from the base of the Washington Monument to transform it into a sun dial. As his response ranges from articulate to school-boy giddy, it’s clear his motivation is sincere: sincere-enough that in 1971 he filed a permit with the National Park Service and waited three years before the snow was just the right depth to make the work. Continue reading

In the Studio with Elien Ronse

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9 Blue Beds I slept. Image courtesy of the artist

I first met the Belgian artist Elien Ronse at Studio Das Weiss Haus, Vienna, on our simultaneous residencies in 2015. This time in Austria was the beginning of her long-term body of research into domestic life, which has since taken her to Taiwan, Germany, Greece, South Korea, France, and now Northern Ireland. Sleeping over in a local person’s house for one night, Ronse stays with anyone from a friend to a stranger, finding willing hosts via word of mouth. She then documents the ways and objects of each person’s intimate life, systemising her records in her archiving processes. She describes herself as a micro-historian, observing the patterns of domesticity and the impact of collectivity on the shaping of personal space. This research forms the basis of her artworks, ranging from installation, film, interventions and games. Continue reading

Torlarp “Hern” Larpjaroensook and Gallery Seescape

Torlarp Larpjaroensook

Torlarp “Hern” Larpjaroensook Work.

Artist, designer, and gallery founder Torlarp “Hern” Larpjaroensook doesn’t let much get in his way. On a beautiful sunny November day with the sounds of his assistants steadily working in the background, Hern and I sat down in his beautiful Chiang Mai home and studio space to talk about the evolution of his work, Gallery Seescape, and the art community of Chiang Mai. Continue reading

The alternative art school movement

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“Back to school” sounds good to children (who get to see their friends every day again) and to their parents (who get to not see their children for a number of hours every week day), but adults often find that their own schooling – say, earning a Master of Fine Arts degree – can be a hassle, what with the job, the kids, the cost of tuition, moving. Tuition for an MFA in sculpture at the Maryland Institute College of Art currently runs $43,760 for a full year (and it is a two-and-a-half year program), and then there are a range of required and optional fees, and we haven’t even gotten to food and accommodations. The low-residency MFA in studio art at the college is exactly half the cost of the full-time rate, which may be more palatable but still a big chunk of change. Continue reading