RE-tooling RESIDENCIES: A Closer Look at the Mobility of Art Professionals

In 2009, the European Commission began a two-year-long research program exploring the practices, outcomes, and influence of artist and curatorial residencies and assessing how such programs contribute to “artistic mobility.” The ultimate goal of the RE-tooling RESIDENCIES project was to compile an in-depth resource for artists and organizations involved—or thinking about getting involved—in the world of residencies, with a close eye cast specifically on Eastern Europe. The project culminated in a conference that brought together artists, curators, activists, managers, and theoreticians for a larger discussion of approaches to residencies. RE-tooling RESIDENCIES: A Closer Look at the Mobility of Art Professionals is a product of the project and conference.

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Practical Sculpture: A Workshop Manual

The late Sally Hersh was a stone sculptor originally know for portrait heads but later for other forms of sculpture and for her teaching career in France and the U.K.  Her book,  finished shortly before her death, was her reaction to seeing many “how to” books on sculpture that left large gaps in the processes of carving and modeling.

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Starting Your Career as an Artist

In Starting Your Career as an Artist: A Guide for Painters, Sculptors, Photographers, and Other Visual Artists, Parsons The New School for Design’s Angie Wojak and Stacy Miller provide advice for almost every conceivable subsection of the art world. From tips for finding good studio space to dealing with inevitable legal issues, Wojak and Miller combine their own advice with that of other professionals in the field—curators, art lawyers, gallery owners, and artists—many of them well-known and respected.

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Sculptors at Work: Interviews about the Creative Process

Victor M. Cassidy, who is a frequent contributor to Sculpture magazine, recently published a valuable series of interviews with working sculptors. The book’s subtitle aptly captures the focus of the book: conversations with working artists about their process (rather than market trends, theory, critics, lifestyle, or money).

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The Artist’s Guide to Grant Writing

In The Artist’s Guide to Grant Writing: How to Find Funds and Write Foolproof Proposals for the Visual, Literary, and Performing Artist, Gigi Rosenberg tutors artists in all fields through the complete process of writing applications for professional development and project grants, awards and fellowships, and residencies. In the preface, Rosenberg, a writer and theater artist with experience writing grants to support her work, describes the insight that followed her stint on a grant-making panel.  She saw the differences between the powerful, vivid proposals that would be funded and the wan, timid ones that wouldn’t. “It transformed me as an artist seeking funding,” she writes.
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Sculpture Casting, Studio Edition

The republication of Dennis Kowal’s 1972 book on sculpture casting includes an interesting means of updating a technical book: on the title page, Kowal has printed a QR Code and a url referring to the software necessary for the code to work. A reader can then use his or her smart phone to scan the QR Code and go directly to updated information on casting.
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I’d Rather Be in the Studio! The Artist’s No-Excuse Guide to Self-Promotion

Alyson Stanfield’s I’d Rather Be in the Studio! The Artist’s No-Excuse Guide to Self-Promotion is an art-business workshop in book format, featuring a strict but kind instructor who anticipates and quickly discredits any complaints. Stanfield writes that she chose the book’s title because “I hear that excuse more than any other from artists who are not promoting their work consistently.” The book is structured around artists’ common excuses, from “There aren’t enough hours in the day to do it all” to “I don’t want to bother people.” Stanfield, whose background in art museums provided the foundation for her art-consultation business, refutes these arguments, providing concrete “actions” in the form of individual chapters that respond to a given excuse.

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