Dewane Hughes: Dallas Farmer’s Market

In “Haikus & Doo-Dahs, Tiny to Titan,” Dewane Hughes’s exhibition of large-scale steel sculptures and maquettes on view at the Dallas Farmer’s Market, the Texas-based sculptor provides the viewer with a new perception of the market and its space.  Hughes’s use of steel, an industrial material, highlights the Market’s unique status as a space devoted to the fruits of agricultural labor that happens to be situated in the midst of one of the largest urban areas in Texas.  The Market itself functions as a kind of in-between space as it operates as a zone between industry and agriculture, metropolis and farmland.  Continue reading

Politics of the Secondhand: Natani Notah

Over the past week I have continued to work on a series of sculptures that transform used metal mixing bowls into faux pottery. So far the process has consisted of first layering gesso onto the surface and lifting, carving, and peeling away certain parts to expose the stainless steel underneath. The next steps have been to sand down the edges where the the gesso ends and the metal begins. Conceptually I am interested in this line serving as a metaphor for the moment where two distinctly different things can come together and coexist, thus resulting in a more beautiful whole. Continue reading

Empowered Women

sculpture

Installation view of SEED, at Paul Kasmin Gallery, June 21 – August 10, 2018. Wangechi Mutu in foreground. Photo: Christopher Stach

“Seed” at Paul Kasmin Gallery in New York brings together 29 emerging to seasoned artists whose work embraces female archetypes — the goddess, warrior, mystic, sage, lover, maiden, and matriarch.  The layout allows works to “talk to each other” and the selection avoids or confronts stereotypes.  Curated by Yvonne Force, one theme is “the complexity and resonance of a long association between the natural world, sexuality and fertility, and spirituality and mysticism.” Continue reading

Organizing Your Career in the Cloud

On any given day, Carrie Seid, a sculptor and mixed-media artist in Tucson, Arizona, has a couple dozen works that are “out,” meaning unsold but not in her studio. Some are consigned to commercial art galleries – there are five galleries in five different states – and others that are in the hands of art consultants (eight in five states). Then, of course, there are far more that are “in” her studio: completed, in progress or part of a public commission. At a manufacturing company, an inventory manager would be in charge of keeping track of where everything is but, in the sole proprietorship that is Carrie Seid Artist, she has to keep abreast of “where are my works, are they getting dusty, are any out on approval with collectors, has anything sold.” Continue reading

Final Update: Cassidy Frye at Art-St-urban

sculpture

My favorite view of Basel and the Rhine

There is a satisfaction that comes along with finishing a residency. Art-St-urban is no different with a feeling of accomplishment but and excitement to leave, and return to everyday life after two months it all seems unfamiliar. In my last month at Art-ST-Urban we finally had the chance to work with Asphalt. Heinz Makes a mixture that is fine and can be molded or cast in many different ways. Continue reading

Talks, Tours, and Tech: Natani Notah

 

Today marks the end of my first week at the International Sculpture Center’s (ISC) residency at Grounds for Sculpture (GFS). Before my plane even landed I felt extremely welcomed by everyone involved. We officially started the week by giving artist talks to ISC and GFS staff, followed by tours of the grounds and studios. Then fellow artist in resident, Layo Bright and I set up our work stations in the MEB Tech Workshop, which will serve as our studio for the remainder of our time here. Continue reading