The Celebration of Humanity in the Arts

Linda Howard Sculpture

Linda Howard “Star Center” 8.5 H x 24’ W x 12 ‘ D Aluminum.

In a rather unexpected setting, nestled in the Chattanooga valley surrounded by mountains, lies Montague Park, once home to city baseball fields, the 33-acre site sat abandoned as if it was beckoning to be adorned with something spectacular. On April 8, 2016 that ‘something spectacular’ arrived in the form of Sculpture Fields at Montague Park (SFMP). Continue reading

In the Studio with John Rainey

John Rainey Sculpture

On left: The Collapse of Structure, 2014. Parian porcelain and z-corp print. On right: The Assumption of Pretence, 2012. Parian porcelain and z-corp print. Photo by Simon Mills Photography, courtesy of Golden Thread Gallery.

In “On Visibility”, body parts are simplified in form but softly hyperreal in finish; they proliferate and mutate, organs becoming cancerous rather than cells. The sculptures’ alluring deep pigmentation and smooth faces – made in a combination of casting, ceramic and 3D printed processes – are also the source of their visceral body horror. Whoever, and whatever, they reference has been translated a step too far and physically corrupted, concentrated down then multiplied, to shift from physical embodiment to over-representation. Continue reading

What artists should know about privacy

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It seemed creepy. Photographer Arne Swenson aimed his camera with its telephoto lens towards the windows of adjacent apartment buildings in New York City, taking pictures of people going about their normal business and exhibiting them in 2013 at New York City’s Julie Saul gallery. One family that found itself in those photographs, which included a mother and her one year-old son in a diaper and her three year-old daughter in a bathing suit, brought a lawsuit, claiming a violation of the family’s privacy under the state’s civil rights law. That law prohibits the use of someone’s name or image for the purpose of advertising or trade. However, in 2015, a New York appellate court found for the artist, who claimed that his images did not constitute advertising but were protected works of creative expression. Continue reading

Interview with Sarah Johanna Theurer

Sarah Johanna Theurer Sculpture

Installation view. Courtesy Hugo Estrela / Vesselroom Project

Sarah Johanna Theurer is an emerging curator, currently attached to Vesselroom Project in Berlin. A researcher in ephemeral arts and techno-social techniques and theories of the twenty-first century, she studied cultural studies and media archaeology at University of Arts Berlin before working with Transmediale in 2015.  At present, she is part of the communications department for 9th Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art, and in this wide ranging interview discusses some of the intricacies of working in the German capital as well as her first independent exhibition ‘f i n e,’ which ran from April 28 – May 8, 2016. Continue reading

Change Up Artist

Robert Irwin Sculpture

Square the Circle, 2015–16. Fabric and wood. Installation view of site-conditioned work in Robert Irwin: All the Rules Will Change, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 2016. © 2016 Robert Irwin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo © 2016 Philipp Scholz Rittermann

Since April 7, the Hirshhorn has been hosting “All The Rules Will Change.” It’s the first Robert Irwin survey outside of California since 1977, and as such only features work made between 1958 and 1970—with exceptions to a couple of installations designed for the exhibition.

The title of the exhibition has several reads. One is a tidy summary of Irwin’s process for art-making: transitioning away from painting to the optical and transformative play of his discs, columns, and later scrims. Another read encapsulates a personal response to looking at his work, and art in general: despite its minimalism, his work is muscular and will force most viewers to change how they see and engage art.  Continue reading

Romina Castiñeira – “El Origen: Te regalo la luz de este viaje hacia el centro”

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Romina Castiñeira

“El Origen” Te regalo la luz de este viaje hacia el centro. Romina Castiñeira Plástico, sal, asfalto, tubos fluorescentes y paisaje sonoro. Medidas aproximadas: 27 x 18 x 4 m. Instalación de sitio específico
Centro Cultural Córdoba, Argentina, 2016.

El Centro Cultural Córdoba presentó el pasado Mayo una muestra altamente conceptual donde la artista visual Romina Castiñeira crea una geografía abstracta, diáfana, envolvente, que se apropia del lugar estimulando posibilidades diversas de desplazamiento para el espectador y poniendo en cuestión la relación entre el adentro y el afuera que determinan los elementos que conforman la instalación. “El Origen” es producto de una invitación que hace el Centro Cultural a la artista para realizar un sitio específico pensado exclusivamente para una arquitectura de gran escala y alta luminosidad, formato ideal para una artista como Castiñeira  que se preocupa por investigar la relación que se establece entre la industria (los materiales), el diseño (espacial) y la arquitectura (el soporte estructural de la obra). Continue reading

The Timeless Art of Mimmo Paladino

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Photos by Chick Heiney, courtesy of Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park

To best vicariously appreciate Mimmo Paladino’s evocative installation Dormienti (Sleepers), poke around the internet and find composer Brian Eno’s electronic score of the same title.  At Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park, this trance-inducing music plays on a loop in a large, dark gallery space, creating a moody and surreal soundscape for Paladino’s ambitious installation, in which 32 life-sized abstracted terracotta human forms rest in the fetal position.  It’s as if their inert earthen bodies have yet to experience the spark of life.  Although unmistakably contemporary, this collaborative work seems timeless and universal, as do many of Paladino’s other sculptures on view.  Even Eno’s electronic music, for all its technological modernity, seems evocative of free-rhythm Gregorian chant. Continue reading

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