Flicker and Border Blur

Jennifer Angus Sculpture

Jennifer Angus, Black wings

Like a lot of people, I suspect, I’m fascinated and utterly engaged by that in the world which I’ll call the “neither/nor”. That is, I’m taken by things – primarily works of art, but also literature, film, theater and even the more mind-boggling realities revealed by science – that are not tidily assigned to very specific categories, things that don’t fit into convenient intellectual or aesthetic boxes, that aren’t amenable to easy labeling and categorization. I’m talking about the equivalents, I suppose, of littoral zones, those ecological areas that straddle the meeting of land and sea – areas that are really neither/nor – and which are, intererestingly, fecund with life. Nature, it seems, often prefers such areas; hedgerows in farmed areas, the edges of forests – all are extremely amenable to the creative process that is life. Continue reading

Making Your Life as an Artist: Making Workbook

Making Workbook inside cover.

Making Workbook inside cover.

In a previous blog post I reviewed the book and digital download Making Your Life as an Artist by Andrew Simonet, a considered insight into the role of art and methods for working efficiently with an art-based skill-set. This matter-of-fact publication has unsurprisingly expanded into an even further practicable format in the Making Workbook. Continue reading

Responding to Suggestions

suggestion-feature

Mark Hopkins, a sculptor in Loveland, Colorado, was offered a commission by the director of the Creation Museum in Petersburg, Kentucky, but the proposed subject was a bit odd. “He wanted me to do a sculpture of Noah’s Ark, including a dinosaur or two,” he said. (The Creation Museum “brings the pages of the Bible to life,” according to its Web site.) “I thought, ‘that’s ridiculous.’ I told him, ‘it will look like Dinotopia.’ It just wouldn’t make any sense, so I rejected the idea.” But he said it nicely, diplomatically, “something like, ‘Let me think about that for a while,’ because you don’t want to hurt someone’s feelings.” Continue reading

Tying the Knots of the World

Françoise Grossen Sculpture

Installation view of ‘Françoise Grossen Selects’, 2016. Photo by Butcher Walsh.
Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.

The more I think about fiber arts, the more enamored I become with it as a form of sculpture. Visiting the Françoise Grossen Selects show at the Museum of Art and Design put this motion into overdrive, as I explored the variety of things that might be done using solely rope. Continue reading

Luciana Fernandez-Literatura Esculpida

Luciana Fernandez Sculpture

Sembranza alambre- tela -semillas de girasol . 170cm-120cm-100cm año 2016 seleccionada.
Salon Nacional Artes Visuales Escultura

Escultora egresada de la Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes Pridiliano Pueyrredón, formada además en talleres con artistas como Juan Maffi, Leo Vinci, Alberto Delponti, Juan Carlos Distéfano y Edgardo Madanes, Luciana Fernández ha indagado en el campo de lo tridimensional siempre teniendo en cuenta el rol que para ella desempeña la literatura como socia fundamental de la obra per sé, donde los fragmentos elegidos –intuitivamente en la mayoría de los casos- complementan la materialidad de sus esculturas. Su carrera la llevó al campo del diseño donde trabajó como realizadora de personajes de animación, integrando el equipo del reconocido animador Rodolfo Saenz Valiente. Su formación incluye el estudio de joyería, ilustración y seminarios sobre arte contemporáneo y estética con distintos profesionales especializados en el tema. Expuso su obra en espacios como el Centro Cultural Recoleta, el Centro Cultural Gral. San Martín y en el 2016 logró tres importantes reconocimientos en escultura: fue seleccionada en el Salón Nacional de Artes Visuales, Salón Nacional del Bicentenario y el Salón Nacional Manuel Belgrano, tres de los espacios más prestigiosos del panoram local argentino. Continue reading

Irina Korina at Gallery for Russian Arts and Design, London

Destined to be Happy Sculpture

Copyright Irina Korina taken from ‘Destined to be Happy’ installation shot, GRAD 2016.

Destined to Be Happy is a new site-specific installation by Russian artist Irina Korina that deliberately forgoes a specific narrative or reading in favour of a host of dynamic and evolving associations. Entering the gallery through a side alley, the viewer moves through a dark tunnel which then opens out into a kind of maze, framed by curved corrugated steel panels and burnt out trees. Silver confetti is scattered across the wooden floor of the space while industrial plastic, occasionally bowed under by pockets of water, frames the ceiling. The walls are also draped in plastic, giving the space the strange aura of a construction site, perhaps a half finished retail space. The most visually striking element of the exhibition is the six large figures assembled atop the protruding legs of mannequin dummies, identified in the exhibition text as The Globe, The Tear Drop, The Fire, The Heart, The Rainbow and The Meteorite. A soundscape composed by Sergey Kasich adds an ominously shifting sonic palette to the installation, where elements slowly merge into one another, thereby blurring the line between fragments of identifiable found sound and digital abstractions. Continue reading

Art As Experience

Witness Sculpture

Installation view, Witness, MCA Chicago. July 2, 2016 – February 19, 2017. Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago.

I’m increasingly realizing that most art can only be experienced in person; the expansive and visceral terrain of a Jackson Pollock canvass, for example, its paint in places measuring nearly a half-inch thick, is entirely lost in translation when transposed into a deadened image in a book (and I can forgive someone for finding Pollock underwhelming if they only ever encounter him in diminutive digital or print reproductions).  At Chicago’s Contemporary Museum of Art is a strong pair of exhibitions which emphatically make the point that art is, at its essence, experiential.  Together, they demand viewer interaction and emotional response. Continue reading