Early History of The ISC In Lawrence, KS

Keepers of the Universe by Eldon Tefft

My sister Laura has been an artist since we were kids.  When she was in her early twenties, Poco Frazier whispered in her ear that she was a sculptor.  The poor girl hasn’t been the same since.

Bernard “Poco” Frazier was a professor in sculpture in the architecture school at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Ks. It is telling that sculpture was taught and was a part of the architecture school at that time.   Frazier had studied and worked with Laredo Taft in Chicago. Continue reading

Community and Space – The relationship between artist/studio art practice and identity

At ISC Gala honoring Lynda Benglis and Tony Cragg lifetime achievement award gala.
From left to right: Me, Emily Nelms Perez, ISC member, Katie Hovencamp, Olga Alexander

First off, it is an absolute thrill to have been awarded the ISC residency at Mana  Contemporary, and would like to thank International Sculpture Center for this opportunity!  I had visited Mana Last Spring for an open house event last season and was immediately impressed by the communal artistic energy reverberating throughout its massive cavernous spaces.  I wanted so much to be part of it. Continue reading

Lygia Pape: A Multitude of Forms

Lygia Pape Sculpture

Lygia Pape (Brazilian, 1927–2004) Livro do tempo (Book of Time) 1961–1963 Tempera and acrylic on wood; 365 parts Photo by Paula Pape © Projeto Lygia Pape

The Lydia Pape exhibition at the Met Bruer through July 23 is a revelation. Altogether, every aspect of its catalog demonstrates the artist’s originality, her ways of championing Brazil’s indigenous cultures and architecture – such as the impoverished seaside Favela da Maré built on stilts, and her geo-philosophical ways of making art. Continue reading

Nested Transmuter Cycle: A Boulder into the Pond

Installation view, Nested Trasmuter Cycle, by MSHR. Courtesy of Interstitial.

I often feel that time is an unspoken quality of sculptural work. Of course, time is inescapable, and so any sculpture that we view must occur over time. The time we spend looking at the work, the time it takes to walk around the sculpture to see it from all angles, the time to sculpt it, which is inscribed in its surface and structure. Time does not stop affecting a work of sculpture, either. Eventually, any material crumbles to dust. Every solid substance is secretly in motion, whether changing form, decomposing away, or slowly moving through space, even as it adheres to the surface of our spinning planet. Continue reading

A World View: John Latham

John Latham Sculpture

A World View: John Latham; Time Base Roller, 1972, Installation view, Serpentine Gallery, London (1 March 2017 – 21 May 2017) Image © Luke Hayes

John Latham is generally considered to be a pioneering voice in British conceptual art. Born in what was Livingston, Northern Rhodesia (now Maramba, Zambia), he later studied in London at Regent Street Polytechnic and then Chelsea College of Art and Design. Over the last couple of years, his work has cropped up in several significant international exhibitions both in the UK and abroad, including the Conceptual Art in Britain 1964–1979 at Tate Britain during the middle of last year. In recognition of both his own innovative body of work, and also his vast influence on later generations of artists, the Serpentine galleries are now showing two concurrent exhibitions dedicated to Latham in Hyde Park, London.   Continue reading